Pytania dotyczące gramatyki języka: angielskiego
Posty: 6 • Strona 1 z 1
 
13.02.2012 14:23:31

simple vs. continuous

 
przez Gość
Warum heißt es "Houston we have a problem" bzw. "Houston we've had a problem" und nicht "Houston we are having a problem" bzw. "Houston we've been having a problem".
 
14.02.2012 08:00:27

Re: simple vs. continuous

 
przez [PONS] yakyuyama
Posty: 306
Dołączył(a): 16.12.2011 12:45:19
Hey Gast,

I am willing to take a stab at this, so here goes...

1) If you say, "We have been having a problem," that would essentially mean that the problem has been continuing for a while and that a solution to the problem hasn't necessarily been found yet, as in:

"We have been having a problem with our heater since it first started snowing back in November. I don't know what to do about it. Do you think you could come take a look at it?"


2) If you say, "We are having a problem," that would essentially mean that a particular problem is happening again after having been resolved at least once in the past, as in:

"We are having the same problem with our heater that we had last week. Do you think you could come fix it again?"


3) If you say, "We have had a problem," (which is supposedly the actual quote), that would essentially mean that the problem has been solved, as in:

"We have had a problem with our heater in the past, but now it works perfectly well."


4) If you say, "We have a problem," that would essentially mean that there is a problem, the problem is urgent, and the problem probably won't go away any time soon, as in:

"We have a problem. It's -20C and snowing, and our heater is broken and no one can come repair it because the roads haven't been plowed yet."

I know I'm not giving you any grammar rules here, but I hope you can see the subtle differences between all four of your example sentences, at least in my point of view.

Cheers,
Yama
 
14.02.2012 17:15:55

Re: simple vs. continuous

 
przez fredbär
 
 
 
 
 
 
Posty: 361
Dołączył(a): 02.10.2011 09:59:52
Hallo Gast,

es ist ein bisschen kompliziert, aber es ist weil der Ausdruck ‚Houston we have a problem‘ einen Zustand erklärt. Es ist keine Aktivität.

Andererseits könnte man ‚Houston we’re having dinner‘ sagen, weil das eine Aktivität erklärt.

Hilft das?

Regards,

fredbär

How charmed I am when I overhear a German word which I understand! - Mark Twain
 
15.02.2012 14:31:58

Re: simple vs. continuous

 
przez Gość
yakyuyama napisał(a):Hey Gast,

I am willing to take a stab at this, so here goes...

1) If you say, "We have been having a problem," that would essentially mean that the problem has been continuing for a while and that a solution to the problem hasn't necessarily been found yet, as in:

"We have been having a problem with our heater since it first started snowing back in November. I don't know what to do about it. Do you think you could come take a look at it?"


2) If you say, "We are having a problem," that would essentially mean that a particular problem is happening again after having been resolved at least once in the past, as in:

"We are having the same problem with our heater that we had last week. Do you think you could come fix it again?"


3) If you say, "We have had a problem," (which is supposedly the actual quote), that would essentially mean that the problem has been solved, as in:

"We have had a problem with our heater in the past, but now it works perfectly well."


4) If you say, "We have a problem," that would essentially mean that there is a problem, the problem is urgent, and the problem probably won't go away any time soon, as in:

"We have a problem. It's -20C and snowing, and our heater is broken and no one can come repair it because the roads haven't been plowed yet."

I know I'm not giving you any grammar rules here, but I hope you can see the subtle differences between all four of your example sentences, at least in my point of view.

Cheers,
Yama



Thank you, that was very helpful.

Cheers,
Gast
 
15.02.2012 14:39:32

Re: simple vs. continuous

 
przez Gość
fredbär napisał(a):Hallo Gast,

es ist ein bisschen kompliziert, aber es ist weil der Ausdruck ‚Houston we have a problem‘ einen Zustand erklärt. Es ist keine Aktivität.

Andererseits könnte man ‚Houston we’re having dinner‘ sagen, weil das eine Aktivität erklärt.

Hilft das?

Regards,

fredbär


Hallo Fredbär,
das leuchtet mir ein. Vielen Dank. Als Hobbyanglist gerate ich doch immer wieder an Grenzen, wo mein Sprachgefühl nicht ausreicht.
Regards,
Gast
 
05.04.2012 13:14:58

Re: simple vs. continuous

 
przez alid1973
 
 
 
 
 
 
Posty: 4
Dołączył(a): 29.03.2012 23:52:24
Guest napisał(a):Warum heißt es "Houston we have a problem" bzw. "Houston we've had a problem" und nicht "Houston we are having a problem" bzw. "Houston we've been having a problem".


Hi Gast,

Yes, 'we have a problem' is correct and it is a Zustand (a state) not an action, but so is 'we are having a problem' and 'we've had a problem'.

The difference between the forms is as follows:

1. We have a problem - this is the state now. You know nothing about how long it's been a problem, just it is one now. Also, because it says 'problem' and because of the situation, we can assume it's urgent, but the grammar alone doesn't tell us that. This tense may also suggest that we do not have any ideas for a solution - there is no end is sight - the problem is 'permanent' from our perspective right now.

2. We've had a problem - this problem started at some time, not specified, in the past and may OR may not be resolved now. The grammar alone in this example doesn't tell us. Also, this tense stresses the state and not a period of time (see 4). A time adverbial makes it clearer:
We've had a problem for the past 4 days - we still have the problem
We've had a problem with that before - at some time, not specified, in the past, but not right now.

3. We're having a problem - this is the state now but we don't think it will last forever - we believe there is a solution so the problem is a temporary state. This would have been possible for the astronaut to say, but wouldn't have carried as much urgency at all.

4. We have been having a problem - this is the state now and the problem started at some time, not specified, in the past and has been going on for some period of time now. We use this tense to stress the time involved, so we almost always include a time adverbial:
We've been having this problem for ages.. for the last 10 hours ... for several days... etc...

Hope this helps!

Rgds,
 
 

Posty: 6 • Strona 1 z 1
 

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